Tag Archives: Dartmouth College

Workshop: Ferrous Attractions – The Science Behind the Magic, Dartmouth College, Hanover NH

NOTE: This is not a Guild Event. We occasionally publish events that may be of interest to our members.

Ferrous Attractions – The Science Behind the Magic – Magnets in Conservation Workshop

NECA, in collaboration with Dartmouth College Library Preservation Services, is pleased to announce the upcoming workshop Ferrous Attractions – The Science Behind the Magic, taught by conservator and AIC Fellow, Gwen Spicer.

Location: Dartmouth College Library Preservation Lab, Hanover, NH
Date: Friday, July 13, 2018 10:00am – 4:30pm
Price: $50 NECA members; $75 non-members (includes $25 NECA annual membership)
Deadline: Register by July 1, 2018

Please email Carolyn Frisa at carolyn@works-on-paper.net to reserve your spot and coordinate payment. NECA membership must be up-to-date to register for the workshop.

Description:
How to fasten or secure an artifact has long been a focus of art conservators in all specialties. We have stitched, glued and adhered items for decades, and with each method, the attempt was always to keep the conservation as reversible as possible. The somewhat recent development of strong, permanent, rare earth magnets has enabled them to be used as a reversible fastener. Neodymium rare earth magnets are far stronger than earlier permanent magnets and have only truly entered the market since 1990. They have great potential as a new tool for conservators.

Could there really be a truly reversible tool that would not harm or create holes that we could use? Before these new magnets can be part of our future, a fuller understanding of how they work is needed. Moreover, a system needs to be developed to determine precisely which attributes a magnet should have for a specific project. Discussion will include: What makes a magnet “permanent”, when were they developed, and how magnets differ from one another (i.e. the various types and their unique materials and properties).

The use of magnets in the past has caused damage, slowing their use among some. However, with a full understanding of how a magnetic system is created and can be adapted, damage can be prevented. To demonstrate a magnetic system and its parts, participants will use a “jig” with various combinations of magnets and metal components. They will also explore the different methods of implementing a magnetic system and the strength of commonly available magnets. Time will be allowed for participants to test a range of magnetic systems and materials with small discussions after before the next one.

This hands-on experience can inspire conservators to adapt a magnetic system to mount any specific artifact. The material will be presented in a hands-on instructional format. Handouts will be provided.

Workshop Objectives
1. What are permanent magnets and the four types of magnetic systems
2. Learn the parts of a magnetic system and how they inter-react
3. How to adapt the parts of a system to best suit your artifact
4. How to record the parts of the system
5. Where to place the magnets and the ferromagnetic part
6. How to properly store your magnets

Instructor: Gwen Spicer, Principal of Spicer Art Conservation, LLC
Gwen is a Textile, Upholstery, Paper, and Objects Conservator, and full-time principal of Spicer Art Conservation, LLC, located in upstate New York. She received her Master’s degree from the Art Conservation Program at Buffalo State College, State University of New York. She has over twenty-five years of experience, is a Fellow of AIC, and has been in private practice since 1995. She has assisted many museums, institutions and private collectors with the treatment of artifacts and antiquities for both display and storage. Gwen is an AIC Kress Publication Fellowship recipient and is currently writing her first book, “Magnetic Mounting for Art Conservation and Museums”. The book will be a practical guide for understanding magnetic systems and will assist both conservators and museum professionals in the creation of magnetic mounts.

Limit 20 participants. A list of recommended lodging, restaurants, and thing to do in the Upper Valley Region will be provided following registration. A limited number of free rooms with local conservators may be available.

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Upcoming Workshop with Gabrielle Fox at Dartmouth College – July 14 & 15

We are excited to announce an upcoming summer workshop with Gabrielle Fox. Registration is now open, but with limited seating. So sign-up if you are interested as we anticipate this workshop selling out quickly.

NEGBW & Dartmouth College Present a mid-summer Workshop with Gabrielle Fox
Covered and Visible: Protected Multi-section Pamphlet Stitch Structure

Full LeatherPlease join us for an inspiring weekend workshop with Gabrielle Fox, where she presents an approachable structure that creates a full leather (cloth or paper) binding, where the spine piece spans over an inner exposed and visible sewing panel.

Based on Project 8 in The Essential Guide to Making Handmade Books, Gabrielle’s Covered and Visible structure creates a natural combination of tight back and hollow spine elements, providing strength and flexibility plus action, all in one structure. The full leather spine can be titled or decorated as a traditional binding.

The delight of this structure is the ease with which it opens and closes, and the possible variations that can be used in both design binding and conservation work. The case of the binding is completed before sewing the text block; the structure can be kept very simple or adapted to something as complex as a full-leather traditional binding.

When: July 14 – July 15, 9:00am – 5:00pm
Where: Dartmouth College Preservation Services, Hanover, NH
Cost: $250 members; $300 non-members (plus a $10 material fee)

Register here.

Gabrielle Fox is a bookbinder based in Cincinnati, Ohio. In the 1980’s she taught throughout England and worked from her studio in Sussex before returning to Ohio in 1990. She travels often to care for collections and teach, most recently to The Daffodil Barn, Wiltshire, UK through Binding re:Defined and jointly with Designer Bookbinders and Society of Bookbinders. Each year she now teaches miniature fine binding at the American Academy of Bookbinding in Telluride, Colorado, USA.

Her work is represented in many public and private libraries, and in 2016 was exhibited in “The Poet of Them All” at the Yale Center for British Art and will be exhibited this autumn with Designer Bookbinders’ “Heroic Works” at North Bennet Street School. Gabrielle is the author of The Essential Guide to Making Handmade Books and compiler of LARKSPUR PRESS: Forty Years of Making Letterpress Books in a Rural Kentucky Community.

www.gabriellefox.com

Any questions can be directed to our Programs Chair, Martha Kearsley at negbwprograms@gmail.com